SPECIAL EVENTS


back in new york city! 

NYC FILM Screening

nYC PRIDE OUTCINEMA

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“We are thrilled to be returning to NY/NJ region for OutCinema of NYC Pride. We started in Ocean Grove and now we’ll be back, building the momentum to bring people together to honor and fight for the humanity of all people.”

- Marilyn Bennett / director & co-producer

june 20TH

8pm

sva Theater

The world premier of From Selma to Stonewall: Are We There Yet? was at QFest New Jersey LGBT Film Festival in Ocean Grove in April 2016. The co-executive producers, Marilyn Bennett and Asbury Park’s Rev. Gil Caldwell, have gone on to show the film to audiences in many locales, from North Carolina to Texas to Montana to Alabama and back to the East Coast with many other stops in between. 

Pride organizers welcome all to the event, “Join for a special panel conversation and screening of this galvanizing documentary of a black preacher and a white lesbian activist forming a bond as they search for the intersection between the civil rights and LGBTQIA+ equality movements of today,” Pride organizers note and go on, “NYC Pride is thrilled to bring back OutCinema in partnership with NewFest and the and the SVA Theater, in a three-day format to celebrate LGBTQIA+ pride and community. Featuring specially curated screenings followed by Q&As and after-parties format provides a wide variety in LGBTQIA+ cinema that reflects the community.”

 

CAST MEMBER NEWS!

Darnell L. Moore's memoir was just released on May 29, No Ashes in the Fire: Coming of Age Black & Free in America (Nation Books)

Rev. Dr. Brad R. Braxton is now Director of the Center for the Study of African American Religious Life and Supervisory Curator of Religion at the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of African American History and Culture

Cara Page is now Director of Programs at Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice

Rev. Frederick Davie has been appointed Chair of the New York City Civilian Complaint Review Board (CCRB) 

Sarah Schulman published her book Conflict is Not Abuse: Overstating Harm, Community Responsibility, and the Duty of Repair in 2016 (Arsenal Pulp Press).

Rev. Dr. Tommie L. Watkins was ordained the first openly gay Black Priest in the Episcopal Diocese of Alabama in November 2016.

In addition, Gil joined with Rev. Dr. Pamela Lightsey and Bishop Melvin Talbert to publish their writings in Faith at the Intersections: A Collection of Writings on Justice for Black and LGBTQ Communities in and Beyond the United Methodist Church (Reconciling Ministries Network).

 

WYOMING EVENTS

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SHEPARD SYMPOSIUM

April 12,  2:45-3:40PM

University of Wyoming - Laramie, WY

Media Matters: Why Matt Shepard's Death Captured the World's Attention and The "Big Picture" Impact. 

An exploration of why Shepard's murder 20 years ago became the focus of media and community attention, the impact it had and what it means for the larger LBGTQ and allied community. Join activists, experts and voices from the front lines fighting hate violence in LGBTQ communities.

Speaker session Thursday, April 12 at 2:45pm with Cathy Renna, Marilyn Bennett, Rod Caspers, Jim Osborn, Barbara Poma.

Cathy Renna is the Principal of Target Cue, a premiere public relations and communications firm that focuses on LGBT and HIV related issues and provides media training, strategic and crisis communications services to diverse non-profit organizations. Renna has particular expertise in crisis and strategic communications and played a central role while at GLAAD in shaping media coverage of the beating death of Matthew Shepard in 1998, a tragedy that became a cultural marker for a shift in media visibility of LGBTQ issues. She was on the ground in Laramie immediately following the public disclosure of Shepard's beating and subsequent milestones including the trials of the perpetrators. She has worked closely with the producers of the Laramie Project and the Matthew Shepard Foundation since.

Barbara Poma, owner of the Pulse nightclub and CEO ~ Executive Director onePULSE Foundation, Inc. For more information or to support onePULSE Foundation 501(c)3  please visit: www.onePULSEFoundation.org. Since the mass shooting at Pulse, Poma has worked tirelessly to promote sensible gun control and is working to create a memorial at the site of the Pulse nightclub to honor the 49 lives lost and educate the public with the message “We will not lethal win."

Jim Osborn was the President of the LGBT student group at the University in 1998 and a friend of Matt’s. His tireless efforts since have helped change the lives of LGBT people in Wyoming and beyond. Jim is one of the founders of “Angel Action” which took the media by a storm and forever changed the way communities responded to Fred Phelps protests and others like it. 

Rod Caspers staged the original production of Conspirare’s Considering Matthew Shepard and recently a production with the Louisiana State University A Cappella Choir for the National Collegiate Choral Organization’s national conference. He has also produced the Laramie Project.

 

 

Shepard Symposium schedule here, plus live streaming & online sessions here.

 

FROM SELMA TO STONEWALL PARTNERS WITH PFLAG TO CELEBRATE THEIR 45TH ANNIVERSARY

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On March 11, 1973 (almost 4 years after the Stonewall Riots), the first meeting of PFLAG was held in New York City at the Church of the Village.

We are honored to be one of five films that PFLAG National is highlighting for their 45th anniversary for chapters nationwide. To celebrate their important and often life-saving work, we are offering our 35-minute digital download of From Selma to Stonewall: Are We There Yet? for $50 to PFLAG chapters through March 2018. Chapter leaders, please contact us directly at fromselmatostonewall@gmail.com to purchase your copy. Read about the PFLAG Anniversary Celebrations here.

PFLAG started with families. For 45 years, they have been providing peer-to-peer support, publications, toolkits, and other resources to make sure that the family members of people who are LGBTQ get the support they need in the way that best serves their needs. This allows families to then further support, affirm, and advocate on behalf of their LGBTQ loved ones. For allies, whether you have a close friend who identifies as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, gender-expansive, or queer (LGBTQ), or don't know someone personally but want to learn more about what it means to be an ally, PFLAG is here to support you on your ally journey. For LGBTQ persons, regardless of how you identify in terms of sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression, PFLAG is there to support you and your family in your journey of discovery.

 
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LAVENDER PEN TOUR: FROM SELMA TO STONEWALL

HOSTED BY CHERYL JONES

February 21, 2018

Listen to the episode here.

At the heart of the Lavender Pen tour of October, 2017 was a recognition that none of us are free until we are all free. One way participants connected LGBTQ oppression with the oppression of people of color and other marginalized communities was watching the film From Selma to Stonewall, which explores the intersection of the fights for African American civil rights and LGBTQ rights. The filmmakers then met the tour in Selma to speak at Brown Chapel and walk the Edmund Pettus Bridge with the tour participants. Filmmaker Caldwell took the original walk with Dr. Martin Luther King. Filmmaker Marilyn Bennett is a lifelong advocate for LGBTQ rights, especially within the church community.

How did this tour, with its recognition of the intersection of these fights, affect them? What was it like to walk the bridge with 300 people, reliving the experience of Civil Rights workers who marched with King? What do they want to share about the impact of shared commitment to each other's fights?

View our photos of the Lavender Pen tour below.

 

GIL & GRACE'S SPECIAL STORY

60 Years Later, Couple Who Got Turned Away From Resort Have Their Honeymoon

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After hearing the story of how Gilbert and Grace Caldwell were denied from their honeymoon resort for being black, a group of 5th graders from New Jersey helped the couple have their 60-year belated honeymoon.

Watch it on CBS News here, and the Steve Harvey show here.

 

OCTOBER 2017 EVENTS FOR

"FROM SELMA TO STONEWALL: ARE WE THERE YET?"

SELMA, ALABAMA

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Marilyn and Gil returned to Selma to be honored by the amazing San Francisco Gay Men's Chorus and Oakland Interfaith Gospel Choir during their stop in Selma during their Lavender Pen Tour of Southern states.

The tour first stopped at Brown Chapel A.M.E. Church where they raised the roof with their powerful singing. The sanctuary vibrated with love and light.

We then marched across the Edmund Pettus Bridge, the site of Bloody Sunday during the first attempt at the Selma to Montgomery March and where Gil marched on the following Tuesday.

 

NORTH CAROLINA FILM TOUR

 

RECKONING WITH OUR PAST, SHAPING OUR FUTURE:

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"We will not become who we might be, until we remember who we were."

- The Rev. Gil Caldwll

The Divinity School at Duke University to acknowledge their history of segregation and Gil’s personal history of being denied entrance to the school.

Wednesday, October 18th, 11:25 am   Worship and Conversation at The Divinity School at Duke University

On October 18th the Divinity School at Duke University leadership will formally acknowledge the practiced segregation of the Divinity School when it would not allow Blacks to enroll in the school. In the 1950's Gil was one of those individuals whose enrollment was denied because of the color of his skin. He received a letter from the Duke Trustees informing him that they had not changed their segregation policies. They wrote, "We hope you will find a Seminary to meet your needs." He went on to attend Boston University.

We expect that the chapel service, at which Gil will be preaching, will be a moving time of formal acknowledgement of the demeaning and repulsive practice of segregation. The service will be followed by a community conversation about issues of race and diversity on today’s campus.

 

SUPER SPECIAL EVENT!

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Monday, October 9, 12:30-1:30 pm -- Brown Chapel AME Church, 410 Martin Luther King St, Selma, AL

Gil and Marilyn will speak at LOVE BUILDS BRIDGES, a day in Selma with the San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus and Oakland Interfaith Gospel Choir during their Lavender Pen Tour of Southern states. Besides words from Gil and Marilyn, the Brown Chapel program will include music by the choirs, oral history, mayoral address, and a special blessing.

At 2:45 pm the speakers, singers and dignitaries will reenact the Selma to Montgomery March across the Edmund Pettus Bridge.

  To the San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus,    I awakened this morning thinking about being with you in Selma. My thoughts:    I would like a lavender tie to wear with my black shirt as I cross the bridge with you. It is my way of symbolizing that black justice and gay justice are intertwined, but "We have miles to go before we sleep,” wrote Robert Frost. (The struggle is not over.) Marilyn and I are looking forward to being with you and the Chorus. Thanks for having persons push me in a wheel chair. I can walk part of the way. But...    I was in Selma for what is known as "Turnaround Tuesday". We crossed the bridge and then returned to Selma. The plans for our security had not been completed. I will be bringing with me these thoughts and emotions:    1. The spirits of James Baldwin, Bayard Rustin and Audre Lourde will be with us; Black Gay persons whose justice commitments linked black justice with gay justice.    2. The spirit of Rev. James Reeb will also be with me. He is representative of the white persons who have been killed as they protested with blacks for justice. As will the spirits of Goodman and Schwerner who with Chaney were killed during Mississippi Freedom Summer. I was there. And also the spirit of the white woman killed in Charlottesville will be with us. I will never forget participating in Jim Reeb's Memorial Service at Arlington Street Unitarian Church in Boston.    3. This time in Selma I will remember the Transgender persons who have been killed and brutalized, many of them persons of color, because of transphobia.    4. The hate that is directed at immigrants from Mexico, at LGBTQI persons and black persons has been uncovered for all to see in this of time of unveiled bias, bigotry and hatred. Once covered up, now emanating from the White House.    5. The words of Martin Luther King, "Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere," have never been more relevant.    Rev. Gil Caldwell Asbury Park, NJ "From Selma to Stonewall: Are We There Yet?"

To the San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus,

I awakened this morning thinking about being with you in Selma. My thoughts:

I would like a lavender tie to wear with my black shirt as I cross the bridge with you. It is my way of symbolizing that black justice and gay justice are intertwined, but "We have miles to go before we sleep,” wrote Robert Frost. (The struggle is not over.) Marilyn and I are looking forward to being with you and the Chorus. Thanks for having persons push me in a wheel chair. I can walk part of the way. But...

I was in Selma for what is known as "Turnaround Tuesday". We crossed the bridge and then returned to Selma. The plans for our security had not been completed. I will be bringing with me these thoughts and emotions:

1. The spirits of James Baldwin, Bayard Rustin and Audre Lourde will be with us; Black Gay persons whose justice commitments linked black justice with gay justice.

2. The spirit of Rev. James Reeb will also be with me. He is representative of the white persons who have been killed as they protested with blacks for justice. As will the spirits of Goodman and Schwerner who with Chaney were killed during Mississippi Freedom Summer. I was there. And also the spirit of the white woman killed in Charlottesville will be with us. I will never forget participating in Jim Reeb's Memorial Service at Arlington Street Unitarian Church in Boston.

3. This time in Selma I will remember the Transgender persons who have been killed and brutalized, many of them persons of color, because of transphobia.

4. The hate that is directed at immigrants from Mexico, at LGBTQI persons and black persons has been uncovered for all to see in this of time of unveiled bias, bigotry and hatred. Once covered up, now emanating from the White House.

5. The words of Martin Luther King, "Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere," have never been more relevant.

Rev. Gil Caldwell
Asbury Park, NJ
"From Selma to Stonewall: Are We There Yet?"